Basilic vein

The basilic vein and its tributariesAnatomical features of the basilic vein, its tributaries and venous outflow areas
~ 3 min

Major veins of the upper limbs are formed by communicating many subcutaneous (or superficial) veins. These include two main veins:

  1. The basilic vein (v.basilica)

    Basilic vein (v.basilica)
    Basilic vein (v.basilica)
  2. The cephalic vein (v.cephalica)

Cephalic vein (v.cephalica)
Cephalic vein (v.cephalica)

In this video, we will consider the anatomy, areas of blood drainage and anastomoses of the basilic vein (v. basilica)

Basilic vein (v.basilica)
Basilic vein (v.basilica)
Basilic vein (v.basilica)
Basilic vein (v.basilica)

It arises from the venous plexus of the hand (rete venosum manus) on the medial side and is a direct continuation of the fourth dorsal metacarpal vein (venae dorsales metacarpales).

Plexus of the hand (rete venosum manus)
Plexus of the hand (rete venosum manus)
Fourth dorsal metacarpal vein (venae metacarpales dorsales)
Fourth dorsal metacarpal vein (venae metacarpales dorsales)

This large vein is located on the back of the hand, as well as on the medial side of the forearm along the bend of the elbow, passes to the arm between the fibers of the biceps brachii muscle. Next, the vein penetrates into the brachial fascia and ends by the brachial vein (v. brachialis).

Brachial vein (v.basilica)
Brachial vein (v.basilica)

The basilic vein has many anastomoses with the cephalic vein along its course.

Brachial vein (v. brachialis)
Brachial vein (v. brachialis)

The largest anastomosis is located in the area of the bend of the elbow and is formed with the intermediate cubital vein (v.intermedia cubiti). This anastomosis has its own anatomical variants of the structure and may be N-shaped or M-shaped.

Intermediate cubital vein (v.intermedia cubiti)
Intermediate cubital vein (v.intermedia cubiti)
Intermediate cubital vein (v.intermedia cubiti)
Intermediate cubital vein (v.intermedia cubiti)

The latter variant is possible with the confluence of the basilic and cephalic veins (v.intermedia basilica et v.intermedia cephalica). They, in turn, are a continuation of the intermediate antebrachial vein (v.intermedia antebrachii).

Cephalic veins (v. intermedia cephalica)
Cephalic veins (v. intermedia cephalica)
Intermediate antebrachial vein (v. intermedia antebrachii)
Intermediate antebrachial vein (v. intermedia antebrachii)

The intermediate ulnar vein communicates with the deep antebrachial veins by an anastomotic vessel (vas anastomoticum).

Anastomotic vessel (vas anastomoticum)
Anastomotic vessel (vas anastomoticum)

Tributaries of the basilic are the following vessels:

  1. Vein to the inferior ulnar collateral artery (v.comitans arteriae collateralis ulnaris inferioris), which drains blood from the ulnar veins and brings it to the basilic vein in the region of the cubital fossa.

    Inferior ulnar collateral artery (v. comitans arteriae collateralis ulnaris inferioris)
    Inferior ulnar collateral artery (v. comitans arteriae collateralis ulnaris inferioris)
  2. The dorsal venous network of the hand (rete venosum dorsale manum), which ends directly by the basilic vein. It drains blood from the dorsum of the palm.

    Dorsal venous network of the hand (rete venosum dorsale manus)
    Dorsal venous network of the hand (rete venosum dorsale manus)
  3. Intercapitular veins (vv.intercapitulares), wgucg end by the dorsal venous plexus and carry blood from the dorsal surface of the fingers two to five.

    Intercapitular veins (vv. intercapitulares)
    Intercapitular veins (vv. intercapitulares)
  4. The dorsal digital veins (vv.digitales dorsalis) of the fingers two to five, which drain blood from the middle and distal phalanges of the fingers and end by the intercapitular veins.

Dorsal digital veins (vv. digitales dorsalis)
Dorsal digital veins (vv. digitales dorsalis)

As mentioned before, the tributaries of the basilic vein, in addition to the cephalic veins, are the deep antebrachial veins. These are indirect tributaries, they communicate with the medial vein through an anastomotic trunk:

  1. Ulnar veins (vv. ulnares)

    Ulnar veins (vv. ulnares)
    Ulnar veins (vv. ulnares)
    Ulnar veins (vv. ulnares) – with the arteries of the same name
    Ulnar veins (vv. ulnares) – with the arteries of the same name
  2. Radial veins (vv. radiales)

    Radial veins (vv. radiales)
    Radial veins (vv. radiales)
    Radial veins (vv. radiales) – with the arteries of the same name
    Radial veins (vv. radiales) – with the arteries of the same name
  3. The deep palmar venous arch (arcus venosus palmaris profundus). It forms the ulnar and radial veins on the right and left upper limbs.

    Deep palmar venous arch (arcus venosus palmaris profundus)
    Deep palmar venous arch (arcus venosus palmaris profundus)
  4. Palmar metacarpal veins and the vein of the thumb (vv.metacarpales palmares et vena princeps pollicis) end by the deep venous arch.

    Palmar metacarpal veins and the vein of the thumb (vv.metacarpales palmares et vena princeps pollicis) – with the arteries of the same name
    Palmar metacarpal veins and the vein of the thumb (vv.metacarpales palmares et vena princeps pollicis) – with the arteries of the same name
  5. Palmar digital veins (vv.digitales palmares)

    Palmar digital veins (vv.digitales palmares) – with the arteries of the same name
    Palmar digital veins (vv.digitales palmares) – with the arteries of the same name
  6. Anterior interosseous veins (vv.interosseae anteriores)

Anterior interosseous veins (vv.interosseae anteriores) – with the arteries of the same name
Anterior interosseous veins (vv.interosseae anteriores) – with the arteries of the same name

It is worth noting that these veins are common tributarie or both the basilic and the cephalic veins.

The region of the bend of the elbow or the anterior cubital region (regio cubiti anterior), where the intermediate ulnar vein passes, has important anatomical significance. The skin and subcutaneous fat in this region are very thin and mobile, so that the basilic and the cephalic veins are clearly visible and accessible for intravenous manipulation. The arteries of the same name lie deeper, under the muscular fascia, so the risk of their damage is minimal. The most frequent venous access is through the intermediate ulnar vein, but the basilic and the cephalic veins are also used.

Obtaining access to the basilic vein is difficult. The neurovascular bundle is located under the fascia of the biceps brachii muscle, the so-called Pirogov aponeurosis. Therefore, often the area of the bend of the elbow is called the Pirogov fossa.

Dictionary

The basilic veinand its tributaries

Basilic vein
v. basilica
Cephalic vein
v. cephalica
Venous plexus of the hand
rete venosum manus
Dorsal metacarpal veins
venae dorsales metacarpals
Intermediate ulnar vein
v. inter media cubiti
Vein to the inferior ulnar collateral artery
v. comitans arteriaecol lateralis ulnaris inferioris
Dorsal venous network of the hand
rete venosum dorsalemanum
Intercapitular veins
vv. intercapitulares
Dorsal digital veins
vv. digitales dorsalis
Intermediate basilic andcephalic veins
v. inter media basilicaet v. intermedia cephalica
Intermediate antebrachial veins
v. inter mediaantebrachii
Anastomotic vessel
vas anastomoticum
Median veins
venae mediale
Ulnar veins
vv. ulnares
Radial veins
vv. radials
Deep venous palmararch
arcus venosus palmaris profundus
Palmar metacarpal veins
vv. metacarpales palmares
Vein of the thumb
vena princeps pollicis
Palmar digital veins
vv. digitales palmares
Anterior interosseous veins
vv. interosseae anteriores
Anterior cubital region
regio cubiti anterior
Main screen of the Easy Anatomy 3D app

Download Easy Anatomy 3D and try it for free

  • 3D Atlas *
  • Interactive notes
  • Videos on Anatomy
  • Anatomy flashcards
* only for iOS version

Easy Anatomy

Learn anatomy effectively

3.2K

Функция доступна в приложении

Download the app